'Mydidae' at The Mac Theatre Belfast.

'Mydidae' at The Mac Theatre Belfast.

Matthew actually started his career path as a successful Joiner for fourteen years, but having also spent time playing lead roles in the local amateur dramatics scene, he knew that his aspirations and dreams lay elsewhere. He therefore downed his tools and risked a career change, moving to London and spending the next two years training at the prestigious Drama Studio London. During his studies, Matthew was fortunate to be awarded the coveted 'Dance & Drama Award (DADA)' as one of the top students of that year.

'Cabaret' The Mac Theatre Belfast.

'Cabaret' The Mac Theatre Belfast.

Since graduating in 2011, Matthew took the initiative and started up the ‘Mercurius’ theatre company whose ‘Chekhov Vaudevilles' production at the Brockley Jack Theatre received several four star reviews.
 
Matthew’s acting career to date has included roles in the West End at the Duchess Theatre and in The Mac Theatre, Belfast. His love of Shakespeare also afforded him the good fortune to be specially selected to perform in ‘Henry The Fifth’ at the official opening of the new Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford Upon Avon.

'The Bear' Th Brockley Jack Theatre London.

'The Bear' Th Brockley Jack Theatre London.

With highly praised performances in Northern Ireland premieres such as 'Cabaret', Jack Thorne's 'Mydidae' and 'Damage', Matthew is fast becoming a creditable and popular actor.

As well as carving out a successful acting career, Matthew has also had the opportunity to direct several youth productions in Belfast as well as facilitate drama workshops for the Lyric Theatre and other companies. He has also picked up his tools again in the form of set building and design!

Matthew's vocal talents have also captured the attention of several established performers and he has delighted audiences across Northern Ireland as a guest performer both on stage and in the recording studio.

Jack Thorne’s ‘Mydidae’ asks for hair-raisingly intimate performances from Forsythe and Maxwell, who give entirely unselfconscious portrayals of people becoming ever more self-conscious.
— Peter Crawley, Irish Times